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My Articles in 2014 (with links)

Bear and bull dancing

Global Economy – Crisis Recovery and Secular stagnation Hypotheses

1. Macroeconomics and Stagnation – Keynesian-Schumpeterian Wars
Policy makers in the advanced economies at the core of the global financial crisis can make the claim that they prevented a new “Great Depression”. However, recovery since the outbreak of the crisis more than five years ago has been sluggish and feeble. Since these macroeconomic outcomes have to some extent been shaped by policy […]
May 6, 2014 | By Capital Finance International

2. Sluggish Postcrisis Growth: Policies, Secular Stagnation, and Outlook

(with Raj Nallari, and Breda Griffith)
Economic Premise n.139, April 2014.

3. Calibrating 2014
 Huffington Post – Posted January 2, 2014 | 12:35 PM
The global economy looks poised to display better growth performance in 2014. Leading indicators are pointing upward — or at least to stability — in major growth poles. However, for this to translate into reality policymakers will need to be nimble enough to calibrate responses to idiosyncratic challenges.

Emerging Markets

4. Liquidity Glut, Infrastructure Finance Drought and Development Banks
The world economy faces huge infrastructure financing needs that are not being matched on the supply side. Emerging market economies, in particular, have had to deal with international long-term private debt financing options that are less supportive of infrastructure finance. While unconventional monetary policies in advanced countries in the aftermath of the global financial crisis […]
September 19, 2014 | By Capital Finance International

5. Long-Term Finance in EMEs: Navigating between Risks and Policy Choices
(with Anderson Caputo Silva, and Catiana García-Kilroy)
Economic Premise n. 152, June 2014
(Also as: Forward – THE EUROMONEY – EMERGING MARKETS HANDBOOK 2015)

6. China and Emerging Markets: Riding Wild Horses
Huffington Post Posted February 3, 2014 | 8:08 PM
One month ago, I discussed some major risks to a slight upturn in the global economic scenario for 2014. Among those risks, concerns with the growth slowdown and challenges with shadow banking in China have already come to the fore as the Chinese Year of the Horse approached…
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7. Sovereign Wealth Funds Are Coming Home
Huffington Post Posted January 15, 2014 | 5:30 PM
Followers of this blog have read several recent pieces on the changing landscape of investment finance in developing countries, particularly in natural resource-rich countries. We have approached the rise of development banks partially filling the void left by the retrenchment of international banking. We have also highlighted how…
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8. Commodity Super Cycle to Stick Around a Bit Longer
Some analysts have predicted that the commodity price boom has played itself out. However, natural resource-based commodity prices (with the exception of shale gas and its downward pressure on US natural gas prices) have remained relatively high over the last few years, despite the feeble global economic recovery (Canuto, 2014). The commodity price spike that […]
August 22, 2014 | By Capital Finance International

Brazil

9. The High Density of Brazilian Production Chains
Huffington Post Posted November 13, 2014 | 12:50 PM
International trade has undergone a radical transformation in the past decades as production processes have fragmented along cross-border value chains. The Brazilian economy has remained on the fringes of this production revolution, maintaining a very high density of local supply chains. This article calls attention to the rising opportunity costs…
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10. Navigating Brazil’s Path to Growth
Huffington Post Posted November 9, 2014 | 10:01 PM
Brazil’s macroeconomic management will face four major immediate challenges in the near future. The response to them will be strengthened if we could have some indication of how to steer the Brazilian economy back to a growth route.
A first major challenge will be the upward realignment of domestic regulated…
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11. Three Perspectives on Brazilian Growth Pessimism
(with Philip Schellekens)
Economic Premise n.148, June 2014
It has become increasingly evident over the last two years that the growth engine of the Brazilian economy has run out of steam. Despite relative resilience during the global financial crisis and following a quick recovery, economic growth registered just 1 percent in 2012 and…

12. What’s Holding Back Brazil?

Project Syndicate,February 21, 2014

One often hears that Brazil’s economy is stuck in the “middle-income trap,” having failed to revive the structural transformation and per capita income growth that it enjoyed before the debt crisis…

13. Clogged Metropolitan Arteries
Huffington Post Posted February 10, 2014 | 3:45 PM
Bad conditions of mobility and accessibility to jobs and services in most metropolitan regions in developing countries are a key development issue. Besides the negative effects on the wellbeing of their populations associated with traffic congestion and time spent on transportation, the latter mean economic losses in terms of waste…

Middle-Income Trap

14. Access to Finance, Product Innovation and Middle-Income Traps
(with Pierre-Richard Agenor)
World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series 6767, February 2014

15.  Access to Finance, Product Innovation, and Middle-Income Growth Traps

(with Pierre-Richard Agenor and Michael Jelenic)

Economic Premise n.137, March 2014.)

Debt Restructuring

16. Orderly Sovereign Debt Restructuring: Missing in Action! (And Likely To Remain So)
(with Brian Pinto and Mona Prasad)
The World Bank Research Observer 01/2014; 29:109-135.
(Accessible in Academia.edu and ResearchGate.net)

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